College Athletic Recruiting Reading Suggestions: Recruiting Services, High School Issues, and Scholarships

dog reading a bookFive articles for those interested in the college athletic recruiting process. Three of them have practical information for families in the recruiting process. If you’re expecting something definitive, be prepared to be disappointed. As usual, so much depends on the individual situation. And there are two “big picture” reads just so that you have no illusions as to what sort of swamp you’re entering.

Recruiting: Using Agencies
This article focuses on swimming but is applicable to all sports. It presents both positives and negatives of using recruiting services according to college coaches. The most interesting part is at the end where one coach states:

“I would safely estimate that at least half to two-thirds of our recruiting classes are comprised of student-athletes who have done their homework and contact us first”

SEC issues statement about ‘over-signing’ loopholes
If you need any more evidence that process of awarding college athletic scholarships has evolved into some convoluted maze where even the gatekeepers aren’t sure of the number of entrances available, read this article. Red-Shirting, Grey-shirting, and now Blue-Shirting:

Officially, a player arrives in the summer as a walk-on. Once football practice begins, he’s awarded a scholarship. The school is allowed to count the scholarship forward “” against the 2015 class “” but the player can play immediately.

Does Playing on a Bad Team Affect My Chances of Being Recruited
Part of the problem with this article is that it’s generic, when the situation can vary dramatically depending on the sport. It discusses the situation relative to your high school team and your club team. There are some good points that parents and players should consider but it doesn’t provide any definitive statement on the situation:

A team’s strengths and weaknesses can affect an athlete’s ability to be recruited both positively and negatively.

Recruit commitments aren’t what they used to be
More on verbal commitments this time as it applies to the Iowa football team. I appreciated this article for the lack of blame directed against the players. In fact, it puts a completely different spin on things by pointing out that:

The 2013 Iowa football team has at least 13 players on scholarship who were previously committed to other schools.

Your HS Coach’s Role in the Recruiting Process
One of the few articles I’ve seen about what players should expect from their high school coach. It provided a list of questions to ask your coach and emphasizes the need to determine who is responsible for what. The only thing missing is what to do when “everyone involved is” not “on the same page.”

 

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